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Passing of red panda cub

Categories: Animals, Red Panda Cub
Veterinary and zookeeper staff worked tirelessly around-the-clock to provide the cub the best possible care

We are heartbroken to announce the loss of the three-week-old red panda cub early the morning of July 16th, after a battle with pneumonia. A full necropsy will be performed at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

The red panda cub, born June 25th, lived briefly with her mother until the veterinary and animal care teams intervened due to maternal neglect. At that time, the cub was brought to the Sacramento Zoo’s Dr. Murray E. Fowler Veterinary Hospital for treatment and 24-hour care in the ICU.

Last week, the cub developed pneumonia. She received medical care to treat the pneumonia including antibiotics, fluid therapy, oxygen, tailored nursing care and feedings to support her nutritional needs. On Monday morning, the cub died in her neonatal incubator despite these treatment measures.

Veterinary and zookeeper staff worked tirelessly around-the-clock to provide the cub the best possible care. They strive daily to not only provide uncompromising care for the animals, but also work to conserve species and habitats around the world.

Red panda cubs have a high mortality rate with roughly 50 percent surviving to the one-month mark. Red pandas are listed as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and are native to Eastern Asia, including Nepal, Myanmar Tibet and south-central China.

The Sacramento Zoo supports the Red Panda Network, an organization committed to the conservation of wild red pandas and their habitat through the education and empowerment of local communities. Support of conservation organizations is increasingly important for this at-risk species whose habitat is threatened due to deforestation through logging and the spread of agriculture. The Sacramento Zoo has been an active participant in the Red Panda Species Survival Plan® since 1999.